Contraceptive Use Among U.S. Teens and Young Adults (2011)

child-trends

This research brief draws data from the 2006 and 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and provides up-to-date information on contraceptive use among teens (ages 15-19) and young adults (ages 20-24).

Results show that there was a significant slower increase in contraceptive use in the 2000s compared to the increase seen in the late 1980s and 1990s.  However, increases in hormonal methods and long-acting methods (such as IUD or implants) of contraception are seen among young women.  An increase in the percentage of young men who used a condom in addition to hormone or long-lasting contraception method was also seen.

Other interesting findings include:

  • The vast majority of sexually experienced teen
    and young adult women have used a birth control
    method at least once in their life.
  • Sexually experienced teen and young adult women
    have used a variety of hormonal and long-acting
    methods of birth control at least once in their life.
  • Sexually experienced young adult women are
    more likely than their teen counterparts to have
    used a hormonal or long-acting method at some
    point prior to the survey.
  • Sexually experienced white, black, and Hispanic
    teen and young adult women differ in their use of
    specific methods of birth control.
  • In 2006-10, almost eight in 10 females (78 percent)
    and 85 percent of males reported using some form
    of contraception at first sex.
  • Teens were more likely than were young adults to
    have used a condom at most recent sex.
  • Teens were more likely than were young adults to
    have used a condom at most recent sex.
  • The use of specific birth control methods at last
    sex by sexually active teen and young adult
    women has not changed since 2002.
  • Among females, use of contraception at most recent sex differed by race/ethnicity.

 

Citation:

Welti, K., Wildsmith, E. and Manlove, J.  Trends and Recent Estimates: Contraceptive se Among U.S. Teens and Young Adults. 2011. Child Trends.

Link to “Contraceptive Use Among U.S. Teens and Young Adults (2011)”

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