Scarleteen

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Scarleteen is an independent, grassroots sexuality education and website geared towards young people in their teens and 20s. Their website provides articles, guides, factsheets, in-depth advice answers, extensive external resource lists and a collective blog written by young people.

Topics addressed include:

  • bodies
  • gender
  • sexual identity
  • relationships
  • sex & sexuality
  • sexual health
  • pregnancy & parenting
  • abuse & assault
  • sexual politics
  • questions and answers

Go to Scarleteen Website

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Future of Sex Education

 photo FoSENatlSexEdStandards_zps82037acc.pngThe Future of Sex Education’s mission is to promote the institutionalization of comprehensive sexuality education in public schools. One of their most important accomplishments is the new National Sexuality Education Standards to provide clear, consistent and straightforward guidance on the essential minimum core content for sexuality education. Click here to download the National Sexuality Education Standards as a free handy PDF document. 

FoSE has also published other useful resources, including a Public Education PrimerSchool Health Primer (coming soon), a Glossary of Education Terms, and The Future of Sex Education: A Strategic Framework.

Visit the Future of Sex Education webpage by clicking here.

The Date Safe Project

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The Date Safe Project educates students and members of the military on intimacy, consent, dating, sex, and respect. Students will learn what consent is and how to respect boundaries, make healthy sexual decisions, and ensure that sexual behaviors are consensual. They also learn about how to support and honor survivors of sexual assault and rape.

The Date Safe project offers certification for parents, speakers, and educators to learn how to present effective programming in their communities and to make full use of their online resources and education materials.

For further information about the Date Safe Project, visit their webpage.

Youth Speak Out on Sex, Love and Teen Pregnancy

“Our Story, Our Words”, produced by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy (NCPTUP), features foster-care involved young people’s views on love, sex, and pregnancy in their own words. Some interesting statistics from the the magazine include:

“Nearly 80 percent of teen mothers do not marry their baby’s father.  On average, these absent fathers pay only $800 a year in child support.” (p. 7)

“Three out of ten girls become pregnant at least by once by age 20.” (p. 7)

“41% of foster youth think the reason teen pregnancy is higher among foster youth is because they want to feel loved.” (p. 7)

Citation: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. (n.d.) Our Story, Our Words. Retrieved from http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/pubs/OurStory_FINAL.pdf

Link to magazine.

Kiss and Tell: What Kids Say About Love, Trust and Other Stuff (2007)

Summary:

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy (NCPTUP) conducted a survey asking young people ages 12-17 to describe their own thoughts and beliefs on love and relationships. This survey packet describes a conversation disconnect between parents and teens. Included in the magazine are tips to start conversations for both adults and teens.

  • Most teens (68%) reported that their friends are in “healthy” relationships but about 1 in 5 teens say that their friends are not in “healthy” relationship.
  • Most teens agreed that trust is a very important part of a “healthy” relationship.
  • Teens said that parents influence their decisions regarding dating and relationships.
  • 1 in 4 teens find it difficult to talk to their parents about relationship issues
  • “Almost one in seven teens have sex before age 15, so having a strong history of communicating about appropriate relationships, love, and sex is important. In fact, most teens say it would be easier for them to delay sex and avoid pregnancy if they were able to have more open, honest conversations about these topics with their parents.”
  • Teen girls look towards parents as role models for healthy relationships while teen boys look toward friends as role models.
  • “Most teens say that they have never felt pressure to be in a romantic relationship before they were ready”

Citation: The National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy. (2007) Kiss and tell: What teens say about love, trust, and other relationship stuff. Retrieved from http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/pubs/kiss_tell.pdf

Link to magazine.

Partnering With Youth (2002)

Summary:

advforyouth

This issue of the Transitions newsletter, published by Advocates for Youth, focuses on community participation to diagnose the causes of a community health problem and to actively engage in creating, implementing, and evaluating strategies to address the problem. The newsletter defines community participation, describes the pros and cons, includes tips for adults partnering with youth, youth partnering with adults as well as tips  to effectively facilitate community participation.

Some notable quotes from the newsletter:

  • “Youth do not live in a vacuum, independent of influences around them. Rather, social, cultural, and economic factors strongly influence young people’s ability to access reproductive and sexual health information and services. To improve young people’s sexual and reproductive health, therefore, programs must address youth and their environment.” (p. 3)
  • “Community participation occurs when a community organizes itself and takes responsibility for managing its problems. Taking responsibility includes identifying the problems, developing actions, putting them into place, and following through.” (p. 4)

Citation: Advocates for Youth. (2002). Community participation partnering with youth. Transitions. Vol. 14., No. 3., p. 1-19.

Link to newsletter.

Benefits of Youth-Adult Partnerships (2006)

This article from University of Hawaii defines youth-adult partnerships and discusses its benefits.  The article also offers tips on how to create youth-adult partnerships.

  • “Young people aged 5–19 are about 25 percent of the U.S. population. They can be active participants in school and community activities, especially if they receive mentoring and encouragement from adults. As the future of our society, and a quarter of the population of our communities, youths are an enormous resource that is relatively untapped. They are tomorrow’s leaders and policy-makers, and if they become engaged in issues that affect our communities now, our future will benefit.” (p. 1)
  • “A youth-adult partnership is a joint effort—youth and adult working together to achieve common goals. In this intentional relationship, adults offer knowledge, experience, and access to resources, while youths impart fresh ideas, new perspectives, energy, enthusiasm, and talents.” (p. 1)
  • “Youth-adult partnerships focus on collaboration and emphasize youths as fresh resources with unique gifts to share.” (p. 2)
  • “Adults and the community reap the benefits of what youths can accomplish when they are challenged, engaged, and valued as citizens.” (p. 2)

Citation: Chong, J. (2006). Benefits of youth-adult partnerships. University of Hawaii’s Cooperative Extension Service. p. 1-2

Link to article.

Make It Better Project

The Make it Better Project was launched in 2010 by the Gay-Straight Alliance Network in order to provide youth and adults concrete tools to make schools safer for LGBT students.

“The Make it Better Project aims to educate, motivate, and unite students and adults to effectively take action to stop bullying and harassment in schools based on actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity”

The website provides ideas and information for youth to increase LGBT awareness and community at the school level and at state and national levels.  There are also resources for parents, teachers and school administrators, and adult supporters who want to take a stand against bullying and advocate for LGBT youth and their rights.

There are also resources for individuals who want support or need to speak to someone in a confidential manner about LGBT issues.

You can connect with the Make it Better Project via their blogFacebook, Twitter, Youtube, and Flickr.

Questions and Answers: LGBTQ Youth Issues FAQ

This online resource on the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SEICUS) website focuses on answering common questions regarding LGBTQ youth.  Topics discussed include data from surveys regarding same-sex sexual behavior, HIV/AIDS and STD risks, mental health, homelessness, schools and education and general trends.

Citation:

“Questions and Answers: LGBTQ Youth Issues.” Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. n.p. n.d. Web. 9 Jan. 2014.

Link to “Questions and Answers: LGBTQ Youth Issues

Howard Brown Health Center (Chicago, IL)

Image Source: http://www.howardbrown.org/hb_locations.asp

Howard Brown Health Center was founded in 1974 and is now one of the nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) organizations.  Howard Brown Center is based in Chicago and serves men, women, infants, youth, and children through many health clinics and research centers.  For more information about Howard Brown Health Center’s history, click here.

Mission:

“Howard Brown exists to eliminate the disparities in health care experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people through research, education and the provision of services that promote health and wellness.”

The Howard Brown Health Center provides many services including:

  • Walk-in Clinic
  • STD & HIV Rapid Testing
  • Transgender Health
  • HIV/STD Prevention & Services
  • Youth services
  • Elder services
  • Community initiatives
  • Alternative Insemination (AI) Program
  • Case Management
  • Counseling & Psychotherapy
  • Domestic Violence Support
  • Workshops & Support Groups

Howard Brown Health Center offers discounted health services to qualifying patients who are uninsured and have low income.  They also accept many insurance plans, in addition to Medicaid and Medicare.

For a list of locations, hours and specific services, click here.

For health related matters, please phone Howard Brown Health Center at 773-288-1600.  For urgent health issues, please call 911.

Connect with them via Facebook or Twitter.

Bisexuality 101 (2001)

The “Bisexuality 101” booklet is published by Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) and contains a detailed and concise introduction to bisexuality.  The booklet also includes common questions with answers regarding bisexuality.  Topics that are covered include relationships, AIDS, politics and biphobia.  Tips on how to increase inclusivity and organizations and resources supporting bisexuality are included.

Citation:

Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. Bisexuality 101. 2001.

Link to PDF of “Bisexuality 101”

Be Yourself (2006)

The “Be Yourself” booklet, published by Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, is targeted towards youth who are or may be GLBT and have questions or are interested in looking for more information via websites and organizations.

Very detailed answers are provided for questions ranging from “Is it okay to be GLBT?” to “Do I need to worry about HIV and AIDS?”  Topics discussed include reparative therapy, ex-gay ministries, gender identity, stereotypes, youth of color, HIV, AIDS, acceptance, coming out, communication, harassment, friendships and family.  A list of organizations and resources is also included.

Link to PDF of “Be Yourself” booklet

Web Sexual Health Resources You Can Use (2008)

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This handy PDF, “Web Sexual Health Resources You Can Use,” was compiled by Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health (ICAH) and contains websites and resources in order to allow you to learn more about science-based programs, lesson plans and teaching strategies, training and curriculum development, research and youth health statistics, and services.

See below for a brief list of the resources.  Links have also been updated (Jan 2014).

Science-Based Programs

Free Lesson Plans and Teaching Strategies

Training and Curriculum Development

Research and Youth Health Statistics

Services

Link to PDF of “Web Sexual Health Resources You Can Use”

Resources for Families on Parent-Child Communication (2005)

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“Resources for Families on Parent-Child Communication,” published by Advocates for Youth, provides a list of resources and materials to help parents begin talking with their children about sex. Resources are organized within the categories of web sites for parents, web sites for young people, books and videos, and organizations.

All print materials can be ordered from local bookstores or via Advocate for Youth’s website.

 

Link to PDF of “Resources for Families on Parent-Child Communication.”

Link to webpage listing the resources that is more computer-friendly

Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood, founded in 1916, is an organization that is committed to providing trusted health care, educating and informing the community, leading the reproductive health and rights movement, and advancing global health.

“Planned Parenthood believes in the fundamental right of each individual, throughout the world, to manage his or her fertility, regardless of the individual’s income, marital status, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, national origin, or residence.”

The website provides up-to-date, clear, and medically accurate information about a variety of topics such as:

Planned Parenthood health centers also provide a variety of services such as:

  • Abortion
  • Birth Control
  • Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)
  • General Health Care
  • HIV Testing
  • LGBT Health Care
  • Men’s Health Care
  • Pregnancy Testing & Services
  • STD Testing, Treatment & Vaccines
  • Women’s Health Care

Click here to find your closest Planned Parenthood Health Clinic.

Connect with Planned Parenthood via Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and Youtube.

American Sexual Health Association (ASHA)

The American Sexual Health Association, founded in 1914, aims to communicate to the public, patients, press, providers and policy makers by developing and delivering sensitive health information about sexual health and sexually transmitted diseases/infections.

Their mission statement:

“The American Sexual Health Association promotes the sexual health of individuals, families and communities by advocating sound policies and practices and educating the public, professionals and policy makers, in order to foster healthy sexual behaviors and relationships and prevent adverse health outcomes.”

The website provides information about:

You can also get updates from the ASHA Blog and through their Youtube channel.

Advocates for Youth

Advocates for Youth, established in 1980, aims to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their sexual and reproductive rights.  They focus on working with young people ages 14-25 in the U.S. and abroad and treat young people as a valuable resource.

Advocate for Youth’s Rights. Respect. Respnsibility (3Rs) Core Values:

RIGHTS: Youth have the right to accurate and complete sexual health information, confidential reproductive and sexual health services, and a secure stake in the future.

RESPECT: Youth deserve respect. Valuing young people means involving them in the design, implementation and evaluation of programs and policies that affect their health and well-being.

RESPONSIBILITY: Society has the responsibility to provide young people with the tools they need to safeguard their sexual health, and young people have the responsibility to protect themselves from too-early childbearing and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV.

Their website contains information such as:

They also publish a variety of publications ranging from topics such as “Peer Education” to “State Facts” and “Abstinence Only Programs.”

You can connect with Advocates for Youth via Facebook, Twitter, & Tumblr

Sexuality Education for Youth with Disability or Chronic Illness: A Resource List

This comprehensive resource list, compiled by the University of Michigan Health System, provides information relating to sexual issues affecting youth with disabilities or chronic conditions.

Providing clear and accurate information to youths with disabilities is important–

“Young people with disabilities are no different from other kids in their need to understand their bodies and relationships; they, too, need to understand how their bodies work, and may have romantic longings and sexual interests. The following resources cover the many aspects of disability, love, sex and puberty in a responsible, open and affirming manner.”

The resource list is includes many web resources, print resources and information about organizations.  You can also ask questions about this topic.

Click here for a link to “Sexuality Education for Youth with Disability or Chronic Illness: A Resource List”

Sexuality Education for Students with Disabilities

The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities provides a list of sexual education resources for children and youths with disabilities.

This includes information on:

Link to “Sexuality Education for Students with Disabilities”