Laws Shaping Abortion Access in Illinois

This resource guide is provided by the section of family planning at the University of Chicago.  It was develepod in 2014 and is a reference guide for legal information regarding abortion care and considerations.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court has held that the right to an abortion is fundamental, but not absolute.
  • A physician, in the course of evaluating the specific circumstances of an individual case, determines when abortion is necessary to preserve health and when a fetus is considered viable.
  • Laws, policies, and court decisions at the federal, state, and local level affect individuals seeking access to abortion in Illinois.

Click here to read more about the legal rights regarding abortion in Illinois

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Accessing Abortion in Illinois: A guide for health care and social service providers

This resource guide was initially created in 2014 by the University of Chicago a program of family planning. The guide provides resources to improve access to abortion., but this section is especially helpful for “health and social service providers advise pregnant persons who may be seeking abortion care in Illinois.”

  • Under Illinois law, a pregnant person who is under age 18 (a minor) can consent to an abortion on her own and does not need parental consent (permission).
  • However, all 50 states have laws that allow minors to consent to certain reproductive health services on their own
  • As of August 15, 2013, Illinois state law requires health care providers to notify an adult family member (defined by the law as a parent, legal guardian, grandparent or resident step-parent who is over 21) at least 48 hours before providing abortion care to patient under age 18.
  • State mandatory reporting laws require health care professionals to breach confidentiality in order to report suspicions of child abuse and neglect, including sexual abuse
  • Illinois’ law requires reporting of child abuse and neglect by mandated reporters to the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS). DCFS investigates cases of child sexual abuse when the perpetrator is a family member, a person living in the home of the child, or a person in a position of of trust or authority (e.g., teacher, babysitter, volunteer in a youth program).

Click here to read more information by visiting the guide online.

Office of Population Affairs Website

The Office of Population Affairs (OPA) oversees the Title X program, the only federal program dedicated to family planning and related preventive services, and also advises the Secretary and Assistant Secretary for Health on reproductive health topics, family planning, adolescent pregnancy and other population issues.

The OPA oversee research and grants that support:

  • Family Planning— assists individuals in determining the number and spacing of their children through education, counseling and comprehensive medical services
  • Embryo Adoption Program–increases public awareness of embryo donation and adoption

* Title XX Adolescent Family Life was originally administered by the Office of Population Affairs but has moved to the Office of Adolescent Health since 2012.

The OPA website also has information regarding general reproductive health, contraception, and STIs.

You can connect with them via Twitter.

Does Watching Sex on Television Predict Teen Pregnancy? Findings From a National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (2009)

This research study, published in the journal Pediatrics, uses data from a national longitudinal sample of youths to look at whether there is a possible connection between exposure to sex on television and adolescent pregnancy.  A previous study by Collins et al. found a relationship between exposure to sex on television and earlier initiation of sex among adolescents and this study is a follow-up and extension of that study.

Data for this survey were from a longitudinal survey of youths ages 12-17 years old.  The youths were first interviewed in 2001 and then were contacted twice in 2002 and 2004 for follow-up surveys.  They survey measured factors such as television viewing, exposure to sexual content on television, sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, and whether he or she has gotten a girl pregnant or become pregnant.

The study found that “adolescents who view substantial televised sexual content have an increased risk of experiencing a pregnancy before age 20, compared with youths who view less sexual content on television” (Chandra et al. 1052).  The study reinforces the importance of encouraging industry leaders of the media to include televised messages about the consequences youths face when engaging in sexual activity and also the importance of educating pediatricians about the effects of television on child and adolescent health.

Citation:

Chandra, A., Martino, S.C., Collins, R.L., Elliott, M.N., Berry, S.B., Kanouse, D.E. and Miu, A. Does Watching Sex on Television Predict Teen Pregnancy? Findings From a National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. (2008). Pediatrics. 122:1047.

Link to “Does Watching Sex on Television Predict Teen Pregnancy?”

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Adolescents’ Reports of Communication With Their Parents About STDs and Birth Control: 1988, 1995, and 2002

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This article, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, reports the trends found in adolescents’ reports of discussion with parents about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and birth control methods from 1988 to 2002.

The data analyzed were from the National Survey of Adolescent Males and the National Survey of Family Growth.  The sample population consisted of adolescents 15-17 years old.

In 2002, fewer female adolescents reported discussion with a parent about STD or birth control methods than in 1995. The share of female adolescents in 2002 reporting no discussion of either topic with their parents increased by almost half compared to 1995. Patterns across time in male adolescents’ discussions of birth control methods with their parents appear stable.

The recent decline in female adolescent reports of parent-communication about birth control and STDs, and the increase in female adolescent reports of no discussion of either topic suggest that public health officials, educators, and clinicians should invigorate their efforts to encourage parents to talk with their children about STDs and birth control.

 

Citation:

Robert, A. and Sonenstein, F. Adolescents’ Reports of Communication With Their Parents About STDs and Birth Control: 1988, 1995, and 2002. 2010. Journal of Adolescent Health. 46:6. 532-7.

Link to “Adolescents’ Reports of Communication With Their Parents About STDs and Birth Control: 1988, 1995, and 2002” (Subscription Only)