Future of Sex Education: Glossary of Terms (2010)

This is a glossary with terms that you might encounter while working in the education field and policy.

This resource is good for educators learning the language, youth looking for definitions or working in reproductive justice organizations that try to change policy, and parents who are trying to understand reproductive justice.

Click here to read the full glossary.

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Accessing Abortion in Illinois: A guide for health care and social service providers

This resource guide was initially created in 2014 by the University of Chicago a program of family planning. The guide provides resources to improve access to abortion., but this section is especially helpful for “health and social service providers advise pregnant persons who may be seeking abortion care in Illinois.”

  • Under Illinois law, a pregnant person who is under age 18 (a minor) can consent to an abortion on her own and does not need parental consent (permission).
  • However, all 50 states have laws that allow minors to consent to certain reproductive health services on their own
  • As of August 15, 2013, Illinois state law requires health care providers to notify an adult family member (defined by the law as a parent, legal guardian, grandparent or resident step-parent who is over 21) at least 48 hours before providing abortion care to patient under age 18.
  • State mandatory reporting laws require health care professionals to breach confidentiality in order to report suspicions of child abuse and neglect, including sexual abuse
  • Illinois’ law requires reporting of child abuse and neglect by mandated reporters to the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS). DCFS investigates cases of child sexual abuse when the perpetrator is a family member, a person living in the home of the child, or a person in a position of of trust or authority (e.g., teacher, babysitter, volunteer in a youth program).

Click here to read more information by visiting the guide online.

Chicago Department for Public Health

A bunch of children and adults by the lake in a park practicing mountain climbing

The Chicago Department of Public Health works to make Chicago a safer and healthier place by working with community partners to promote health, prevent disease, reduce environmental hazards and ensure access to health care for all Chicagoans. The CDPH works to provide leadership for public health, identify, analyze, & track issues, define problems and guide public health action, inspect food establishments to ensure safe food supply, and establish a public health presence in city neighborhoods.

To learn more about the mission and services of the Chicago Department of Public Health, click here. 

EngenderHealth

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EngenderHealth
is a global organization dedicated to activism in sexual and reproductive health, specializing in women’s health. For over seven decades, EngenderHealth has been a positive force for improving the lives of men, women, and families with their impressive range of programming. According to their mission, EngenderHealth works to “promote gender equity, advocate for sound practices and policies, and inspire people to assert their rights to better, healthier lives” by partnering with local organizations in dozens of countries around the world.

The website is home to a wide array of resources published by EngenderHealth, including training curricula, clinical guidelines, instructional videos, brochures, papers, and articles, many of which are available for free download. These materials cover topics such as Family PlanningHIV, AIDS, and STIs, Maternal Health, and Gender Equity, among others. They have a variety of informational videos as well.

Creating Safe Space for GLBTQ Youth: A Toolkit (2005)

The Creating Safe Space Toolkit for GLBTQ Youthpublished by Advocates for Youth and Girl’s Best Friend Foundation, is intended for youth-serving professionals, especially in fields such as youth development, education, health care, and social work.

This toolkit addresses topics concerning homophobia and transphobia among youth and provides advice and tips in assessing an organization’s internal climate and staff’s personal attitudes regarding sexual orientation and gender identity, developing proactive policies, and developing positive attitudes regarding GLBTQ people.

The first part of the toolkit complies a lot of data from studies and surveys that looked at the homophobic climate in the U.S, sexual orientation development, family relationships, GLBT youth of color, substance abuse, lack of GLBT youth positive role models, sexual risks, and suicide risks.  The second part of the toolkit provides tips and strategies for creating a safe and inclusive space for GLBTQ youth.

Click here for a PDF of the “Creating Safe Space for GLBTQ Youth” Toolkit

Advocates for Youth

Advocates for Youth, established in 1980, aims to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their sexual and reproductive rights.  They focus on working with young people ages 14-25 in the U.S. and abroad and treat young people as a valuable resource.

Advocate for Youth’s Rights. Respect. Respnsibility (3Rs) Core Values:

RIGHTS: Youth have the right to accurate and complete sexual health information, confidential reproductive and sexual health services, and a secure stake in the future.

RESPECT: Youth deserve respect. Valuing young people means involving them in the design, implementation and evaluation of programs and policies that affect their health and well-being.

RESPONSIBILITY: Society has the responsibility to provide young people with the tools they need to safeguard their sexual health, and young people have the responsibility to protect themselves from too-early childbearing and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV.

Their website contains information such as:

They also publish a variety of publications ranging from topics such as “Peer Education” to “State Facts” and “Abstinence Only Programs.”

You can connect with Advocates for Youth via Facebook, Twitter, & Tumblr

Preventing Teen Pregnancy among Marginalized Youth: Developing a Policy, Program, and Research Agenda for the Future: Full Report (2009)

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The Healthy Teen Network, with the support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, has long explored how to better meet the needs of marginalized youth and subsequently reduce their risk for early pregnancy and parenting. In 2008, a year-long effort included: a review of the literature on what we know about today’s youth, their risk factors and what works to prevent early pregnancy among those most marginalized; development of a brief paper which synthesized these findings; a one-day summit including a diverse set of experts in the fields of teen pregnancy prevention and youth development to discuss the state of the field and develop a set of policy, program and research recommendations for moving forward, and a presentation and discussion with the field at large during Healthy Teen Network’s annual conference.

The Executive Summary provides a brief description of the issues, the summit and the recommendations for future policy, research and programs. The Executive Summary can be viewed here: Preventing Teen Pregnancy Among Marginalized Youth: Executive Summary

For the full report: Preventing Teen Pregnancy Among Marginalized Youth: Full Report