What is Reproductive Justice? Video

This youtube video is called “What is Reproductive Justice?” This video asks people in the reproductive movement what reproductive justice means to them. COLOR from Colorado is represented.

Click here to see the video.

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NAPAWF’s (National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum) Reproductive Justice Survey Project

This report sets out to list the needs of Asian American women in Chicago. Asian American women from Chicago were invited to participate in the community circle conversations  and online survey and talk about their reproductive justice needs.

Click here to read the full report.

2014 Deportations Hurt Women Infographic Series

This resource shows statistics and images about how deportations affect women and their reproductive health.

Women who migrate to the U.S. and are undocumented risk being detained and deported. This separates the mother from the child. Women try to come back and reunite with children but if caught are then held in detention center a.k.a prison away from their children. These children are placed in the welfare system. Women are detained when migrating to the U.S and denied proper healthcare.

Click here to go to this resource.

“Sexual and Reproductive Freedom for Asian American Women.” In Asian American Women: Issues, Concerns, and Responsive Human and Civil Rights Advocacy, (2003)

This chapter is about Asian American women and the obstacles that stand in the way of their sexual freedom. The chapter talks about how speaking about sex is a very taboo subject in most Asian American communities so there is very little talk about Asian American women’s reproductive and sexual life. Many resources are not culturally competent and do not include such things as squat birthing, which is an option among the Asian American community.  The chapter ends by making recommendations.

Click here to read the chapter.

 

Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center. Reproductive Justice Agenda, 2001.

This report is from a gathering of indigenous women that came together in South Dakota to talk about their reproductive justice rights and agenda. From this gathering they created the Agenda for Native Women’s Reproductive Justice. Some of the things listed in the agenda are:

  • sexuality and reproduction education
  • right to safe and affordable abortions
  • right to north safe deliveries

At the end of the report you will find the authors of the agenda.

This report is helpful for those who want to know more about Native American/Indigenous reproductive justice advocates and supporters during the early 1900s.

Click here to read the full report.

 

Removing Stigma: Towards a complete understanding of young latinas’ sexual health

There are many components that make up reproductive health for Latinas including: STI’s, depression, lower rates of access to healthcare, etc. Focusing on just pregnancy prevention leaves out many other factors young Latinas face.

This article focuses on how to better understand the needs of Latinas in terms of reproductive health. It

  • pushes for inclusion of immigrant Latinas
  • asks that the reproductive field take into account socioeconomics
  • proposes policies to watch out for

Check out the full article here.

Adolescents, Protecting: Ensuring Access to Care and Reporting Sexual Activity and Abuse

This reference guide was created in 2004 by the American Academy of Family Physicians.  It is a reference guide that provides information as a key for health professionsl to ensure that adolescents have access to the health services they need.  It includes sexual and reproductive health services information.

  • Sexual activity and sexual abuse are not synonymous. It should not be assumed that adolescents who are sexually active are, by definition, being abused. Many adolescents have consensual sexual relationships.
  • It is critical that adolescents who are sexually active receive appropriate confidential health care and counseling.
  • Open and confidential communication between the health professional and the adolescent patient, together with careful clinical assessment, can identify the majority of sexual abuse cases.
  • Physicians and other health professionals must know their state laws and report cases of sexual abuse to the proper authority, in accordance with those laws, after discussion with the adolescent and parent, as appropriate.
  • Federal and state laws should support physicians and other health care professionals and their role in providing confidential health care to their adolescent patients.
  • Federal and state laws should affirm the authority of physicians and other health care professionals to exercise appropriate clinical judgment in reporting cases of sexual activity.

Click here to read more about providing the best care for adolescents

 

Accessing Abortion in Illinois: A guide for health care and social service providers

This resource guide was initially created in 2014 by the University of Chicago a program of family planning. The guide provides resources to improve access to abortion., but this section is especially helpful for “health and social service providers advise pregnant persons who may be seeking abortion care in Illinois.”

  • Under Illinois law, a pregnant person who is under age 18 (a minor) can consent to an abortion on her own and does not need parental consent (permission).
  • However, all 50 states have laws that allow minors to consent to certain reproductive health services on their own
  • As of August 15, 2013, Illinois state law requires health care providers to notify an adult family member (defined by the law as a parent, legal guardian, grandparent or resident step-parent who is over 21) at least 48 hours before providing abortion care to patient under age 18.
  • State mandatory reporting laws require health care professionals to breach confidentiality in order to report suspicions of child abuse and neglect, including sexual abuse
  • Illinois’ law requires reporting of child abuse and neglect by mandated reporters to the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS). DCFS investigates cases of child sexual abuse when the perpetrator is a family member, a person living in the home of the child, or a person in a position of of trust or authority (e.g., teacher, babysitter, volunteer in a youth program).

Click here to read more information by visiting the guide online.

Listen to Youth: Adult Allies Must Support the Repeal of Illinois’ Forced Parental Notification Law

by Renee Bracey Sherman

Check out the full article on RH Reality Check

As May comes to a close, so do National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month campaigns. Some of the conversations this monthhighlighted the need for comprehensive, age-appropriate health and sexuality education, and to ensure young people have access to contraception.

But sadly, it was also a month filled with messages that judge and shame pregnant and parenting teens and young women who seek abortion.

One place where the tension between supporting and shaming really comes through is in my home state of Illinois. The issues of young people, sex, pregnancy, parenting, andabortion have been heating up in recent years due to a fight around the implementation of the forced parental notification law.

The Parental Notice of Abortion Act requires an abortion provider to notify the parent or guardian of a young person age 17 or younger who’s seeking an abortion within 48 hours of the teen receiving care. If a young person does not feel they can go to their parent or guardian, there is a provision that allows them to request a bypass from a judge. Of course this is not a simple process—it requires navigating the complex court system, in addition to missing school to see a judge who might let their personal feelings about abortion block the young person’s access to reproductive health care. In a small town, where everyone knows each other, it can also mean that a young person loses any and all privacy around their medical decisions; shaming gossip spreads fast amongst the cornstalks…

Read more on RH Reality Check

California Core Competencies for Providers of Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Programs/Services (2008)

The Core Competencies are intended for adult providers of adolescent sexual and reproductive health and serve as a foundation of professional capabilities that all providers should strive to possess in order to deliver effective, sensitive and appropriate sexual health care and services to adolescents.

The Core Competencies are divided into 5 major domains:

  1. Professional and Legal Role
  2. Adolescent Development
  3. Youth-centered Approach and Youth Culture
  4. Sexual and Reproductive Health
  5. Pregnancy-STIs-HIV

Information is provided that details what a provider should know and should be able to do for each domain.

Citation:

Core Competencies Subcommittee of the Adolescent Sexual Health Work Group (ASHWH), California Core Competencies for Providers of Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Programs/Services. 2008. Core Competencies.

Link to “California Core Competencies for Providers of Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health.”

Office of Population Affairs Website

The Office of Population Affairs (OPA) oversees the Title X program, the only federal program dedicated to family planning and related preventive services, and also advises the Secretary and Assistant Secretary for Health on reproductive health topics, family planning, adolescent pregnancy and other population issues.

The OPA oversee research and grants that support:

  • Family Planning— assists individuals in determining the number and spacing of their children through education, counseling and comprehensive medical services
  • Embryo Adoption Program–increases public awareness of embryo donation and adoption

* Title XX Adolescent Family Life was originally administered by the Office of Population Affairs but has moved to the Office of Adolescent Health since 2012.

The OPA website also has information regarding general reproductive health, contraception, and STIs.

You can connect with them via Twitter.

Teen Source

STDs, Teens, Birth Control, Sexual Health, Relationships

TeenSource.org  is an online resource for young adults ages 13-24. With reliable, non-judgemental information in regards to sexual health, STDs, Birth Control, Contraceptives and relationships. In addition to providing this information to all teens, the website also features a clinic locator for teens in California as well as information on the rights teens have to health care in the state of California.

Link to website.

Go Ask Alice!

goaskalice

 

Go Ask Alice! is a health Q&A resource produced by Alice! Health Promotion at Columbia University.

The website allows browsers to submit questions in regards to health, search for answers through thousands of already answered questions and obtain reliabable health information.

Questions are not limited to sexual health but also include; alcohol & drugs, nutrition, emotional health, fitness, relationships and general health questions.

All questions are updated to reflect the most current health information and research.

To visit the website and Ask Alice your own questions: Go Ask Alice!

Teen Pregnancy and Other Risky Behavior

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This fact sheet provided by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy covers statistics regarding drug, alcohol, tobacco use, delinquency and sexual activity among teens.  Teens who drink or use drugs are often more sexually active and less likely to use contraception than teens who do not use drugs or drink alcohol.

According to the NCPTP: More than one-third of sexually active teens and young adults ages 15-24 report that alcohol or drug use has influenced them to do something sexual.

To view the full document click below:

Teen Pregnancy and Other Risky Behavior

For more resources from the NCPTP visit their website: www.teenpregnancy.org

Competence as a Predictor of Sexual and Reproductive Health Outcomes for Youth: A Systematic Review

This article published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, the purpose of the article was

To examine the association between “competence” and adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) outcomes. Competence refers to the development of skills to perform tasks successfully in four areas including social and behavioral, cognitive, emotional, and moral competence. We conducted a systematic review of research published from 1985 through 2007… Helping adolescents to achieve cognitive, social, and behavioral competence may reduce the likelihood of sexual activity and teen pregnancy, and increase contraceptive use.

The article discusses the method of the research conducted and the results. You can view the entire article here: Competence as a Predictor of Sexual and Reproductive Health Outcomes for Youth

Character as a Predictor of Reproductive Health Outcomes for Youth: A Systematic Review

Abstract:

“To review research examining the influence of character on adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH). We defined character as comprising two positive youth development constructs: prosocial norms and spirituality. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral research published from 1985 through 2007 that examined the association between two character constructs (prosocial norms and spirituality) and ASRH outcomes. We coded results as showing a protective association, risk asso- ciation, or no association, and as longitudinal, or cross-sectional. We considered consistent associations from at least two longitudinal studies for a given outcome to be sufficient evidence for a protective or risk association. There is sufficient evidence to indicate that prosocial norms and spirituality can be protective factors for some ASRH outcomes including intention to have sex, early sex or ever having sex, contraceptive and condom use, frequency of sex, and pregnancy. The generalizability of findings by age, race/ethnicity, and gender was unclear. Findings suggest that some character sub-constructs are associated with a reduced likelihood of several adverse ASRH outcomes and with an increased likelihood of using contraceptives and intending to use condoms. Further research is needed to better understand mixed results and results showing some character sub-constructs, such as religious affiliation, to be associated with adverse ASRH outcomes.”

Full text not available without subscription. Click here.

Citation: House, L.D., Mueller, T., Reininger, B., Brown, K., Markham, C. M. (2010). Character as a predictor of reproductive health outcomes for youth: a systematic review. Journal of Adolescent Health. Vol. 46., Issue 3., p. S58-S74

Positive Youth Development as a Strategy to Promote Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health

“Positive Youth Development as a Strategy to Promote Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health” is an editorial of the research study titled “A Review of of Positive Youth Development Programs that Promote Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health,” which can be found in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Summary:

The use of positive youth development (PYD) is a potential strategy to promote adolescent health because they enhance an adolescent’s ability to respond effectively to developmental challenges they may face. PYD programs help teens seek  positive experiences and support through adults, their school environment, volunteer experiences, and work environment in the future.

PYD program goals should foster one or more of the following developmental outcomes in youth:

  • Connectedness–pro-social and bonding.
  • Competence–cognitive, social, behavioral, emotional, and moral.
  • Character–spirituality and pro-social norms.
  • Confidence–self-efficacy, belief in the future, self- determination, clear and positive identity
  • “An essential part of public health is to provide America’s youth with accurate, age-appropriate information about sexual risk reduction, the benefits of abstaining from sex, teen pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, and STI. A number of sex education programs have been developed and shown to effectively reduce sexual risk behavior.” (Gavin et al., 2010, p. S1)
  • “High-quality youth development programs are characterized by the presence of goals that promote positive development, the creation of opportunities and experiences that enable young people to nurture their interests and talents, practice new skills, and gain a sense of confidence, competence and belief in the future, and the creation of an atmosphere of hope and the valuing of youth.” (Gavin, et al., 2010, p. S3)

Citation: Gavin, L. E., Catalano, R. F., David-Ferdon, C., Gloppen, K.M., Markham, C.M. (2010). Positive youth development as a strategy to promote adolescent sexual and reproductive health. Journal of Adolescent Health. Vol. 46. p. S1-S6

Link to editorial.

Link to “A Review of of Positive Youth Development Programs that Promote Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health”

SexEdLibrary

 photo 9a48579ee97f8c08087acd44098ccc79_zps6a24d19a.jpg

SexEdLibrary, a website designed by the Sexual Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS), is the most comprehensive online sex education resource.  They’ve analyzed  hundreds of lesson plans from many sources to offer easy access to the very best information on topics such as sexual and reproductive health, puberty, abstinence, relationships, sexual orientation, body image, self-esteem, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, unintended pregnancy, and more

The website is divided into the following sections:

Click here to access the SexEdLibrary website

Click here to send feedback or email SexEdLibrary

Click here to access the SIECUS website

A Review of Positive Youth Development Programs That Promote Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health

“A Review of Positive Youth Development Programs That Promote Adolescent Sexual & Reproductive Health” has an editorial titled “Positive Youth Development as a Strategy to Promote Adolescent and Reproductive Health” that can be used together. What is quoted below comes directly from the editorial, but is supported from the findings of this research study.

Summary:

The use of positive youth development (PYD) is a potential strategy to promote adolescent health because they enhance an adolescent’s ability to respond effectively to developmental challenges they may face. PYD programs help teens seek  positive experiences and support through adults, their school environment, volunteer experiences, and work environment in the future.

PYD program goals should foster one or more of the following developmental outcomes in youth:

  • Connectedness–pro-social and bonding.
  • Competence–cognitive, social, behavioral, emotional, and moral.
  • Character–spirituality and pro-social norms.
  • Confidence–self-efficacy, belief in the future, self- determination, clear and positive identity
  • “An essential part of public health is to provide America’s youth with accurate, age-appropriate information about sexual risk reduction, the benefits of abstaining from sex, teen pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, and STI. A number of sex education programs have been developed and shown to effectively reduce sexual risk behavior.” (Gavin et al., 2010, p. S1)
  • “High-quality youth development programs are characterized by the presence of goals that promote positive development, the creation of opportunities and experiences that enable young people to nurture their interests and talents, practice new skills, and gain a sense of confidence, competence and belief in the future, and the creation of an atmosphere of hope and the valuing of youth.” (Gavin, et al., 2010, p. S3)

Citation: Gavin, L.E., Catalano, R. F., David-Ferdon, C., Gloppen, K.M., Markham, C.M. (2010). A review of positive youth development programs that promote adolescent sexual and reproductive health. Journal of Adolescent Heath. Vol. 46. p. S75-S91.

Link to article.

Link to “Positive Youth Development as a Strategy to Promote Adolescent and Reproductive Health”