A Trauma Informed Approach for Adolescent Sexual-Health

This is a report that talks about how to do comprehensive sexual education with youth that have been through trauma.

It covers sexual health, sexual education, populations affected, preventions, trauma, strengths and needs, therapeutic services and safety plans for those who have experienced trauma.

Click on the link before to read more.

A-Trauma-Informed-Approach-for-Adolescent-Sexual-Health

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“Sexual and Reproductive Freedom for Asian American Women.” In Asian American Women: Issues, Concerns, and Responsive Human and Civil Rights Advocacy, (2003)

This chapter is about Asian American women and the obstacles that stand in the way of their sexual freedom. The chapter talks about how speaking about sex is a very taboo subject in most Asian American communities so there is very little talk about Asian American women’s reproductive and sexual life. Many resources are not culturally competent and do not include such things as squat birthing, which is an option among the Asian American community.  The chapter ends by making recommendations.

Click here to read the chapter.

 

Removing Stigma: Towards a complete understanding of young latinas’ sexual health

There are many components that make up reproductive health for Latinas including: STI’s, depression, lower rates of access to healthcare, etc. Focusing on just pregnancy prevention leaves out many other factors young Latinas face.

This article focuses on how to better understand the needs of Latinas in terms of reproductive health. It

  • pushes for inclusion of immigrant Latinas
  • asks that the reproductive field take into account socioeconomics
  • proposes policies to watch out for

Check out the full article here.

Answer: Sex Ed, Honestly

answer

Answer provides honest, accurate answers about sex in response to the many questions teens and adult professionals have about this complex topic. Answer has provided high-quality training to teachers and other youth-serving professionals. Answer also uses peer-to-peer communication to offer sexuality education directly to teens through the teen-written Sex, Etc. magazine and website.

To find out more about Answer, click here. 

Amplify

Amplify - A Project of Advocates for Youth

Amplify is a project of Advocates for Youth. Advocates for Youth champions efforts to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. Advocates believes it can best serve the field by boldly advocating for a more positive and realistic approach to adolescent sexual health.

Advocates for Youth envisions a society that views sexuality as normal and healthy and treats young people as a valuable resource. The core values of Rights, Respect, and Responsibility animate this vision. Amplify also has information on sexual health campaigns by state and by international cities.

To read more about Amplify, click here.

Ambiente Joven

Young Scene

Ambiente Joven is a project of Advocates for Youth and is dedicated to the young Latino gay, lesbian, bisexual and transsexual communities in USA and Latin America with the goal of providing information on sexual and mental health. Ambiente Joven has a great deal of Spanish-speaking resources that attest to LGBTQ topics in Latin America.

To read more about Ambiente Joven, click here.

Scarleteen

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Scarleteen is an independent, grassroots sexuality education and website geared towards young people in their teens and 20s. Their website provides articles, guides, factsheets, in-depth advice answers, extensive external resource lists and a collective blog written by young people.

Topics addressed include:

  • bodies
  • gender
  • sexual identity
  • relationships
  • sex & sexuality
  • sexual health
  • pregnancy & parenting
  • abuse & assault
  • sexual politics
  • questions and answers

Go to Scarleteen Website

EngenderHealth

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EngenderHealth
is a global organization dedicated to activism in sexual and reproductive health, specializing in women’s health. For over seven decades, EngenderHealth has been a positive force for improving the lives of men, women, and families with their impressive range of programming. According to their mission, EngenderHealth works to “promote gender equity, advocate for sound practices and policies, and inspire people to assert their rights to better, healthier lives” by partnering with local organizations in dozens of countries around the world.

The website is home to a wide array of resources published by EngenderHealth, including training curricula, clinical guidelines, instructional videos, brochures, papers, and articles, many of which are available for free download. These materials cover topics such as Family PlanningHIV, AIDS, and STIs, Maternal Health, and Gender Equity, among others. They have a variety of informational videos as well.

Youth Involvement in Prevention Programs (2001)

advforyouth

This “Issues at a Glance” piece from Advocates For Youth discusses that young people gain more from an experience when they are directly involved in program development/sexual health programming.  This article also provides effective tips on implementing youth involvement. Some of their findings include:

  • Programs for youth developed in partnership of youth and adults:
    • build young people’s skills, reduce their sexual risk-taking behaviors
    • benefit the youth who help to develop the program
    • have a greater impact on the young people served
  • Encouraging youth participation allows the organization to gain a more credible and a honest perspective of young people’s needs
  • Encourages adults to adopt the attitude of viewing Youths as Partners  rather than Youths as Objects or Youths as Recipients

Citation: Klindera, K. & Menderweld, J. (2001). Youth involvement in prevention programs. Advocates for Youth. p. 1-4

Link to article in English.

Link to article in Spanish.

Link to article in French.

Partnering With Youth (2002)

Summary:

advforyouth

This issue of the Transitions newsletter, published by Advocates for Youth, focuses on community participation to diagnose the causes of a community health problem and to actively engage in creating, implementing, and evaluating strategies to address the problem. The newsletter defines community participation, describes the pros and cons, includes tips for adults partnering with youth, youth partnering with adults as well as tips  to effectively facilitate community participation.

Some notable quotes from the newsletter:

  • “Youth do not live in a vacuum, independent of influences around them. Rather, social, cultural, and economic factors strongly influence young people’s ability to access reproductive and sexual health information and services. To improve young people’s sexual and reproductive health, therefore, programs must address youth and their environment.” (p. 3)
  • “Community participation occurs when a community organizes itself and takes responsibility for managing its problems. Taking responsibility includes identifying the problems, developing actions, putting them into place, and following through.” (p. 4)

Citation: Advocates for Youth. (2002). Community participation partnering with youth. Transitions. Vol. 14., No. 3., p. 1-19.

Link to newsletter.

Librarians Guide to Sex Ed Resources (2006)

Librarians have a unique opportunity to help parents, educators and teens obtain age-appropriate, medically accurate and culturally relevant information and resources they need to be informed about sexual health.  For some, a library may be their only source of information.

Advocates For Youth complied a list of print, audio, and web-based resources addressing sex and health especially for youth. Librarians can use this list as a tool to aid young people in finding resources available when seeking sex and sexual health information.

Citation: Ratner, J. & Huberman, B. (2006). The librarian’s guide to sex education resources. Advocates For Youth. p. 1-89.

Link to web resources.

American Sexual Health Association (ASHA)

The American Sexual Health Association, founded in 1914, aims to communicate to the public, patients, press, providers and policy makers by developing and delivering sensitive health information about sexual health and sexually transmitted diseases/infections.

Their mission statement:

“The American Sexual Health Association promotes the sexual health of individuals, families and communities by advocating sound policies and practices and educating the public, professionals and policy makers, in order to foster healthy sexual behaviors and relationships and prevent adverse health outcomes.”

The website provides information about:

You can also get updates from the ASHA Blog and through their Youtube channel.

Advocates for Youth

Advocates for Youth, established in 1980, aims to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their sexual and reproductive rights.  They focus on working with young people ages 14-25 in the U.S. and abroad and treat young people as a valuable resource.

Advocate for Youth’s Rights. Respect. Respnsibility (3Rs) Core Values:

RIGHTS: Youth have the right to accurate and complete sexual health information, confidential reproductive and sexual health services, and a secure stake in the future.

RESPECT: Youth deserve respect. Valuing young people means involving them in the design, implementation and evaluation of programs and policies that affect their health and well-being.

RESPONSIBILITY: Society has the responsibility to provide young people with the tools they need to safeguard their sexual health, and young people have the responsibility to protect themselves from too-early childbearing and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV.

Their website contains information such as:

They also publish a variety of publications ranging from topics such as “Peer Education” to “State Facts” and “Abstinence Only Programs.”

You can connect with Advocates for Youth via Facebook, Twitter, & Tumblr

Medical and Public Health Sexual Health Education Recommendations (2007)

This fact sheet issued by ICAH reviews the recommendations for Sexual Health Education in schools by Medical and Public Health organizations such as:

  • American Academy of Pediatrics
  • American Medical Association
  • World Health Organization
  • American Public Health Association
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
  • Society for Adolescent Medicine

These organizations recommend that Sexual Health Education programs should include the following topics:

  • Abstinence
  • Basics of reproduction
  • Human development (puberty)
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • HIV/AIDs
  • Contraceptives and other barrier methods
  • Communication and behavioral skills (negotiation, refusal, etc)
  • Relationships (familial, sexual, platonic)
  • Information about access and/or condom availability
  • Sexual orientation and gender
  • Decision -making, values, and responsibility

In addition to these topics, some organizations have further recommendations or guidance on Sexual Health Education.

To view the fact sheet click HERE

For further information regarding National Education Standards for Sexual Health Education please visit Futureofsexeducation.org for PDF handouts of the standards for grades K-12.

Educating Teenagers About Sex in the United States (2010)

This data brief published by the Centers for Disease Control shows data collected from teens (ages 15-19) who answered questions about formal sexual education they have received and whether or not teens talk to their parents about sex .  Sex education in schools and other places, as well as received from parents, provides adolescents with information to make informed choices about sex at a crucial period of their development.

  • Female teenagers were more likely than male teenagers to talk to their parents about “how to say no to sex,” methods of birth control, and where to get birth control
  • Parental communication about sex education topics with their teenagers is associated with delayed sexual initiation and increased birth control method and condom use among sexually experienced teenagers
  • About one-half of teenagers reported first receiving instruction on “how to say no to sex,” STDs, and how to prevent HIV/AIDS while in middle school.

Citation:  Martinez, G. (2010).  Educating Teenagers About Sex in the United States.  CDC Data Brief.

Link to “Educating Teenagers About Sex in the United States”

Comprehensive Sex Education: Research and Results (2009)

This research takes a look at federal spending on abstinence programs that are proven ineffective.  Statistics that compare the effectiveness of abstinence only programs with comprehensive sex education programs show that the latter is greater and that abstinence programs have no viewable effect on teens reducing sexual activity and/or using safety measures if they do engage in such acts.

  • A congressionally mandated study of four popular abstinence-only programs by the Mathematica found that they were entirely ineffective.  Students who participated in the programs were no more likely to abstain from sex than other students.
  • Experts estimate that about one young person in the United States is infected with HIV every hour of every day.
  • Among youth participating in “virginity pledge” programs, researchers found that among sexually experienced youth, 88 % broke the pledge and had sex before marriage.  Further, among all participants, once pledgers began to have sex, they had more partners in a shorter period of time and were less likely to use contraception or condoms than were their non-pledging peers.

In addition to the information regarding the research done on abstinence programs, the article also includes information regarding the success and need for comprehensive sex education.  According to studies completed, as listed in the article, comprehensive sex education works to reduce teen sexual behavior and encourages using safety measures.

Beyond the results, the article also provides the statistics and information as to why it is so crucial for comprehensive sex education programs.

Citation:  Advocates for Youth (2009).  Comprehensive Sex Education:  Research and Results.

Link to article.

Mathematica Policy Research – Impact of Abstinence Only Education (2007)

This report examines the behavioral impact of four selected programs that received funding through the Title V, Section 510 grants: (1) My Choice, My Future! In Powhatan, Virginia; (2) ReCapturing the Vision in Miami, Florida; (3) Families United to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (FUPTP) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and (4) Teens in Control in Clarksdale, Mississippi. This report provides results from a multi-year, experimentally-based impact study and examines the impact of these programs on teens sexual abstinence, their risks of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, and other behavioral outcomes. The report is based on survey data collected in 2005 and early 2006 – four to six years after study enrollment – from more than 2,000 teens who had been randomly assigned to either a program group that was eligible to participate in one of the four programs or a control group that was not.

The researchers looked at two sets of outcome measures, Sexual Behavior (rates of sexual abstinence, rates of unprotected sex, number of sexual partner, etc.) and Knowledge and perceptions of Risks Associated with Teen Sexual Activity (youth perceptions of the effectiveness of condoms and birth control pills and etc.)

The impact findings show no overall impact on teen sexual activity, rates of unprotected sex and some impacts on knowledge of STDs and perceived effectiveness of condoms and birth control pills.  Approximately half of all high school youth report having had sex and one-quarter of sexually active adolescents have an STD.  The findings from this study show a continued need for rigorous research and education to combat the high rate of teen sexual activity and its consequences.

Citation: Trenholm, C., Devaney, B., Fortson, K., Quay, L., Wheeler, J., & Clark, M. (2007). Impacts of Four Title V, Section 510 Abstinence Education Programs. Mathematica Policy Research Inc.

Link to “Mathematica Policy Research – Impact of Abstinence Only Education.”

Teen Source

STDs, Teens, Birth Control, Sexual Health, Relationships

TeenSource.org  is an online resource for young adults ages 13-24. With reliable, non-judgemental information in regards to sexual health, STDs, Birth Control, Contraceptives and relationships. In addition to providing this information to all teens, the website also features a clinic locator for teens in California as well as information on the rights teens have to health care in the state of California.

Link to website.